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Weekly Education- 20200615

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Weekly Education- 20200615
-Why regenerative medicine.
-Improving upon the standard of musculoskeletal care.

Weekly educational meeting for the team at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine where we discuss the basics of what we do for arthritis, tendinitis, injuries, and back pain.


Okay, all right, so welcome to our first weekly educational meeting. This is Siddarth Tambar from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine. In this weekly format, I’m here to talk about a lot of the basics of what we’re doing in clinic to help treat arthritis, tendonitis injuries, and back pain. This is really situated for my team, all of you guys, in terms of getting us on the same page. And whether that is discussing concepts related to the rheumatology side with inflammation or the regenerative side regarding procedures and sort of philosophical bend with how we approach things, the idea is that we’re all sort of on the same page, understanding, messaging, all that kinda stuff.

And this works best if it’s kinda back and forth. Meaning if it’s not just me talking, I can do that if needed, but I think it works best if you guys have questions as well. In particular, Jackie, you’re talking to patients more and more. They’re probably asking you a lot of questions. I think as you have questions, kinda asking me, that’s how we learn. Right? Lilia, you’ll learn just kind of the basics of what we’re doing as you start conversing with patients more, it’ll be the same kinda thing. This is really meant to help fill in the details regarding the frequently asked questions sheet that we’re building out for what we do around here. And of course, Devi, this is good for you to at least get the basics. Then also to help coach me. Am I messaging things appropriately on a non-medical level? And then also kinda integrating and synthesizing everything that we’re doing.

We are definitely going to be videotaping this. It is videotaping. Good. Mainly because if there’s anything that is work-related, content-related, information-related, that is HIPAA compliant, we want to videotape, tape, and sorta distribute. I just think that going to be smart going forward.

So I thought a good topic to start our first one is why we even are involved in regenerative medicine? Like what’s the reason, what’s the purpose, what’s the why. And it’s really a couple-fold. The big picture to me is we can do better. Right? Something I’ve been talking about more and more is, as we come out of corona, we’re starting to realize there’re people talking about going to back to normal. And I would say, forget about normal. Why don’t we do better? Why don’t we take this is an opportunity to say, why don’t we do better? So regenerative medicine is one of those things. How do we do better?

So, as an example, when you take individuals who are at the level where their musculoskeletal condition is so severe, where surgery’s being discussed, the British Medical Journal has documented that only 20% of orthopedic surgeries meet Level I evidence for evidence and purpose of treatment. And what that means is, Level I evidence means that you have double blind, placebo-control. It’s like your highest level of evidence in medicine. So that means 80% of those surgeries do not meet that criteria. What that really means is that there’s opportunity to do better. Whether that’s on the non-surgical side. Whether it’s on the minimally invasive side. Things that we do. Or whether that’s even on the surgical side. You know, how can medicine do better knowing that only 20% of them meet that highest level of evidence? So first and foremost is how do we do better? And regenerative medicine, while it’s a relatively new field, the concepts, which we’ll talk progressively over the next few weeks, are built on sound medical concepts and in a low-risk fashion.

We’re thinking about risk so much more aggressively now. In large part because we’re all obsessively thinking about corona. But the reality is that when it comes to medicine, we should be thinking about risk in everything. We should be thinking about the risk involved in a blood draw. We should be thinking about the risk of actually coming to the clinic rather than doing this in a telehealth setting. Let alone we should be thinking about risk when it comes to medications, when it comes to surgeries, when it comes to procedures. The general public doesn’t always think about this proactively. They sometimes rely on us, on the physician end. And I think where we can add a lot of value to people is that when it comes to their musculoskeletal health, how do we help them re-understand or begin to understand risk and reward when it comes to their musculoskeletal health.

Okay, good. So that’s kind of one big picture. The other big picture is when it comes to musculoskeletal health, most people take the following approach. They wait until something is so severely bad that they cannot do anything before they actually pursue treatment. That’s crazy. Meaning if somebody’s got back pain, they don’t address that when they’ve got back pain initially. They wait until it’s so severe that they can’t work, till they can’t lift up their kids, till they can’t do anything. And they’re missing a chance to do something at an earlier stage to make things better. So whether that is addressing an injury at an early stage with something like physical therapy or exercises. Whether that’s emphasizing things like weight loss, more of an anti-inflammatory approach, the diet supplements functional medicine. Or, if somebody has something that is early on not responding to treatment, rather than just doing things like ice, rest and anti-inflammatory medications, can we help to improve stability at that functional unit that’s been damaged so that we can prevent this from getting worse. That is really where regenerative medicine can shine at that early stage. Because traditional medicine, the way that it’s approached, is if someone’s got persistent pain, you’re basically masking that with pain medication, steroid injections, ice. And you’re just waiting until it gets worse. The reality is if you’re 16, 18, 20 years old you’re probably going to get better on your own. For the rest of us, that’s just not how life works. Right? That progression and accumulation of injuries and mild soft tissue problems eventually leads to instability, which then leads to arthritis, tendonitis, and more problems. If we can catch some of those issues earlier on, regenerative medicine can help to improve stability and actually put somebody on a better trajectory course.

So why regenerative medicine? Because we need a higher standard. Because we need to be thinking about risk more proactively. Because there’s a huge scope of area that we can do better for people that have more advanced conditions. And because, can we treat people at an early stage to prevent this from getting worse? So, you’re starting to hear about more and more formal organizations starting to recognize these kind of treatment modalities. Whether it’s platelet-rich plasma from knees or other conditions, but this only going to be growing. And, you know, I’m pretty excited to be in this at a ground level. Questions? Jackie.

– [Jackie] I have to think of some. I will have some. Trust me.

– Okay, good. Yeah, I think going forward as much back and forth is helpful because number one, it, I think the best way to learn is if you’re asking questions. Right? And we’re going back and forth with that. Number two, I think as you start to talk to patients and hear their questions, like the way you respond to them, is how you’re actively learning at the same time. And then the reality is that helps me learn as well. That helps me to refine thoughts and philosophical approach to treatment as well. Good.

– [Student] At what point do you decide they are no longer benefiting from weight loss or PT and it’s time to intervene?

– Such a great question. Right. So when do we decide someone is failing conservative treatment like weight loss or strengthening? You know, the nice thing about medicine is that you can really just ask are you making progress? Right? So if you take somebody that has, let’s say, back pain, right? Well, start some physical therapy, some weight loss. If at the two month mark, six week mark, they’re telling you, hey look, I’m like 40% better, great. Give it more time. Right? But if at some point they say, look I’m doing my part appropriately, I’m still not making progress, that’s the time to jump in and intervene. So, medicine offers us this great concept that we can get feedback from a patient immediately. And we can figure out when they’re kind of plateauing, and that’s the best time to intervene. Reality is, a lot of our patients don’t quite do that. They kind of wait for us to initiate. But it works better if they’re initiating on their own, pushing proactively, and then we’re getting feedback from them in terms of when we realize we need to push harder. What else? Yes?

– [Lilia] When….

– You don’t need to raise your hand, Lilia. Yeah.

– [Lily] When do you know when there isn’t…. Is there a time where you cannot help these….

– Yeah. Great question. So when do we know when we can’t help them?

– [Lily] Yes.

– The reality is that there is data on some of these things. Right, so we know someone that has advanced knee arthritis can still benefit from treatment. But someone that has advanced hip arthritis, less likely to benefit from this treatment. So it’s going to vary from area to area. A lot of that is still relatively early understanding. But we know that different areas will respond differently. We know that certain types of tendon tears, right, if someone has a partial tendon tear or even if it’s a full tendon tear but it’s still pretty closely approximated, that can still respond well. But we know one that’s more pulled apart really just needs surgery. Now the thing, the interesting thing is that even in those kind of cases, the kind of treatment that we offer can actually help to augment a surgical process long-term as well.

A lot of it is defintely understanding certain things really would be better off with surgery. But in the same way that, let’s say, cardiac surgery went from being the dominant way of treating advanced coronary artery disease to now it’s a very small subset of that. Where the vast majority is handled with minimally invasive procedures. That’ll be the same thing with what we’re doing.

What else? Jackie? No questions from you. Putting you on the spot.
– I can’t think.
– Okay. All right, good. I know. I know.
– [Jackie] No, but I am doing a spreadsheet of what the main….
– The FAQ. Good. Good, good, good. Okay good. If there’s nothing else, thank you, guys. This is a good start. The back and forth is helpful for me. Thank you very much. Yeah, bye.


***For more educational content:
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Subscribe to our Newsletter

See our blog:

Chicago Arthritis Blog

Listen to the Regenerative Medicine Report podcast:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenerative-medicine-report/

***For evaluation and treatment at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine:
Determine if you are a Regenerative Medicine treatment candidate:

Candidate Form

Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/contact-us/

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: All content in this message/video/audio broadcast and description including: infor­ma­tion, opinions, con­tent, ref­er­ences and links is for infor­ma­tional pur­poses only. The Author does not pro­vide any med­ical advice on the Site. Access­ing, viewing, read­ing or oth­er­wise using this content does NOT cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and it’s author. Pro­vid­ing per­sonal or med­ical infor­ma­tion to the Principal author does not cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and the Principal author or authors. Noth­ing con­tained in this video or it’s description is intended to estab­lish a physician-patient rela­tion­ship, to replace the ser­vices of a trained physi­cian or health care pro­fes­sional, or oth­er­wise to be a sub­sti­tute for pro­fes­sional med­ical advice, diag­no­sis, or treatment. You should con­sult a licensed physi­cian or appropriately-credentialed health care worker in your com­munity in all mat­ters relat­ing to your health.

***About this video***
In this video Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine discusses why regenerative medicine is a necessary step in musculoskeletal care.

 

How doctors can still help during Covid

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How doctors can still help during Covid.
Even though the current situation is difficult, your trusted physician should still be available to assist you during this time of crisis. For our patients at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine we are still available to guide you through this time, and maximize your musculoskeletal health. For people new to our practice, feel free to call, email, text, or message your questions to us.

***For more educational content:
Sign up for our email newsletter:

Subscribe to our Newsletter

See our blog:

Chicago Arthritis Blog

Listen to the Regenerative Medicine Report podcast:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenerative-medicine-report/

***For evaluation and treatment at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine:
Determine if you are a Regenerative Medicine treatment candidate:

Candidate Form

Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/contact-us/

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: All content in this message/video/audio broadcast and description including: infor­ma­tion, opinions, con­tent, ref­er­ences and links is for infor­ma­tional pur­poses only. The Author does not pro­vide any med­ical advice on the Site. Access­ing, viewing, read­ing or oth­er­wise using this content does NOT cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and it’s author. Pro­vid­ing per­sonal or med­ical infor­ma­tion to the Principal author does not cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and the Principal author or authors. Noth­ing con­tained in this video or it’s description is intended to estab­lish a physician-patient rela­tion­ship, to replace the ser­vices of a trained physi­cian or health care pro­fes­sional, or oth­er­wise to be a sub­sti­tute for pro­fes­sional med­ical advice, diag­no­sis, or treatment. You should con­sult a licensed physi­cian or appropriately-credentialed health care worker in your com­munity in all mat­ters relating to your health.

 

Inflammation, Pain, and Musculoskeletal Health

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Inflammation, Pain, and Musculoskeletal Health
Inflammation is complicated. But it definitely has a role in musculoskeletal health, pathology, and pain.
Hello, this is Siddharth Tambar from Chicago arthritis and regenerative medicine. On this video today I am talking about a fundamental issue when it comes to your musculoskeletal health and that is inflammation. First and foremost it’s important to understand the difference between acute and chronic inflammation. Acute inflammation would be when you’ve sprained an ankle, acutely injured your shoulder or knee, and it feels very inflamed, hot, warm, maybe a little bit swollen as well. That is generally the body’s normal way of trying to recover from an injury. Meaning you have an acute injury, trauma, your body brings in platelets, red blood cells, growth factors to help try to heal that kind of injury. In most circumstances that’s a good process. Occasionally too much acute inflammation can be problematic, but normally that is the normal process of trying to recover from an acute trauma. On the other hand, there’s chronic inflammation.
Chronic inflammation is a problem. And the reason why is because it’s your body’s way of trying to function and recover but is not doing so appropriately, and will actually prevent a normal healing process and normal function. So when it comes to chronic inflammation, it’s important to understand the difference between systemic or total body inflammation, versus local chronic inflammation. So systemic inflammation or total body inflammation is a problem because it can cause a number of issues including inflammation in the joints, damage in the joints, and sort of permanent damage and persistent functional problems. It can also make you more prone to metabolic syndrome as well as cardiovascular disease. Chronic inflammation is on a systemic level is a big problem and leads to a lot of pathology and pain and dysfunction long term. There’s then chronic inflammation at a local level meaning at a one joint, one tendon level. You could see that as persistent inflammation within a knee that is chronically swollen, or a tendon that is chronically strained or inflamed as well. That leads to not only persistent pain, instability, dysfunction, but also damaged in some cases as well. You can have that chronic inflammation if you have a joint or tendon that is chronically unstable or if you have some other process systemically that is causing that inflammation in that joint.
So chronic inflammation is a problem. Ways that you can control that include trying to be as clean and healthy when it comes to an anti-inflammatory diet. That can mean different things to different people, but as a general rule it, to me, at least it means more of a plant-based diet, reduced refined sugars. Each person probably has some degree of susceptibility to inflammation based on their diet and that can vary from person to person. Working with an expert, proper nutritionist can help you in that regard.
There are certain supplements that can also help with chronic inflammation- omega-3 and turmeric have benefit as well that’s been shown to help not only osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis in some cases. And can be as useful as chronic Anti-inflammatory medications as well. In some cases if there’s significant chronic inflammation, medications are necessary to help control those kind of conditions. Those medications work by modulating your immune system to prevent that chronic inflammation. And then lastly in some cases regenerative medicine treatments, orthobiologic treatments, can be helpful as well either because the actual treatment itself has an anti-inflammatory effect or because if you have an instability issue by improving instability, you can reduce the chronic inflammation with that joint as well.
Inflammation has some good parts if it’s acute but is a problem if it’s chronic. It’s something that can be treated and evaluated. It’s important to recognize, it’s important to treat it. And if it’s a component of your pain and inflammation and dysfunction, it’s something that should be checked out. Have a good day. Be well, and bye-bye.
***For more educational content:
Sign up for our email newsletter:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/newsletter/
See our blog:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/blog/
Listen to the Regenerative Medicine Report podcast:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenerative-medicine-report/

***For evaluation and treatment at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine:
Determine if you are a Regenerative Medicine treatment candidate:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenexx-candidate-form/
Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/contact-us/

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: All content in this message/video/audio broadcast and description including: infor­ma­tion, opinions, con­tent, ref­er­ences and links is for infor­ma­tional pur­poses only. The Author does not pro­vide any med­ical advice on the Site. Access­ing, viewing, read­ing or oth­er­wise using this content does NOT cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and it’s author. Pro­vid­ing per­sonal or med­ical infor­ma­tion to the Principal author does not cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and the Principal author or authors. Noth­ing con­tained in this video or it’s description is intended to estab­lish a physician-patient rela­tion­ship, to replace the ser­vices of a trained physi­cian or health care pro­fes­sional, or oth­er­wise to be a sub­sti­tute for pro­fes­sional med­ical advice, diag­no­sis, or treatment. You should con­sult a licensed physi­cian or appropriately-credentialed health care worker in your com­munity in all mat­ters relat­ing to your health.
***About this video***
In this video Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine discusses inflammation, pain, arthritis, tendinitis, and injuries.

Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine update 20200415



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Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine update 20200415

Update on the happenings from Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine.
-Covid19/Corona Virus updates
-Testing challenges
-Good news!

Hello, this is Siddharth Tambar from Chicago arthritis and regenerative medicine. In this video this is meant to give you an update as to what’s going on here at Chicago arthritis and regenerative medicine on April 15th, 2020. In the middle of the covid-19 outbreak. There are some interesting challenges and also some positive things. I’ll start with the challenges and then get to the positive things.

So interestingly, I do have several patients that it’s come to my attention have turned out to be covid-19 positive. These are patients where we’ve done telemed evaluations because they have some chronic issues that were assisting with in either their autoimmune spectrum or chronic musculoskeletal issues. And it’s interesting. There is variety in terms of who is who has been affected but in general these are people that are typically a little bit higher risk either based on age or other medical issues. And what’s interesting is thankfully all these people have they seem to have done well, meaning they’ve recovered. Only one person was actually hospitalized and required formal medical treatment and has done well. In all cases they’re now all sort of quarantined, their families quarantined, and they seem to be recovering.

We’ve a couple of cases where people have really good stories from the last maybe six to eight weeks that sounds like based on their travel history that maybe at one point in the last month, maybe they were infected with covid-19. Hard to prove that this point of course, but some suspicion that these people could have had that. Another really challenging thing that I’m hearing is still about the testing. I think that’s improved but I’ve heard cases where people who very clearly were at some risk, not necessarily high high risk people based on age or other comorbidities. But as an example someone who works at a hospital and had fevers, cough, dry cough, as well as had lost his sense of smell, some classic things that have been described about covid-19. And he tried to get checked out at the hospital that he works at and they really wouldn’t test him. And he ended up actually getting testing on his own and tested positive. Paying out of pocket for that and tested positive. And thankfully he did that because he’s now self-quarantined, his whole family is self-quarantined. They’re doing all the right things. These are good citizens and good people of our society that have done that but they’ve had to find solutions that had to go above and beyond what our system could even help them out with which is which is disappointing at like that bigger picture level, but at that local micro-level to know that people still take that that seriously not only their own health, but their responsibility to others was heartening to me. And I’ve seen that in a couple of cases and so I’m actually happy to see that.

It brings me to the to another challenge, which is we’re getting to the point where either to some degree society is trying to get back to business as usual in two weeks, toward early May or that may get pushed off until mid-may. I think for those of us that can think about this rationally and sensibly life going back to normal is still going to be delayed for some time. We’ll have some version of normal, but it’s not going to be full on what we were two to three months ago. I think we have to be honest with that. And one idea is can we start to check some degree of antibody testing to determine who’s been exposed previously to covid-19, who has more of an acute exposure, and who hasn’t been exposed so that we can start to risk stratify people when it comes back to going to work. Take into consideration not only some of their other medical comorbidities, medications that they’re on, but their actual exposure history to covid-19. Because as time goes on we may realize that a lot more people have been exposed and are now possibly immune or lower risk- maybe is the way to think about it. Some of the challenges that I’m hearing and and I am someone and our clinic and our outfit is trying to actually get antibody testing kits, but some of the things that we’re hearing some of the challenges include what is the validity of some of these kits when it comes to testing. And how have they been tested and how they been verified. And the challenge is that in an attempt to get more kits out there, some of these may have very limited testing, some of these may have been tested in a very small number of patients. Some of these may have been tested not over months, maybe not even over weeks, maybe over days and so that that is that’s a little bit of a challenge. And as a individual physician the way that I try to think about this is if the evidence is muddy and the situation is little bit hazy, first and foremost is there good evidence that we can rely on. And are there low-risk, efficacious options for my patients to help us make good smart decisions. And sometimes there’s a little bit of conflict in those two things, meaning is there great evidence and what is a smart low-risk good option. And it can be a challenge but trying to make some good smart medical decisions is always the right way to go and I don’t know if we have the full answers right now in terms of what antibody tests are best and most appropriate to use but my hope is that over the next couple weeks we start getting more clarity on that so that we can start making smart decisions as to how people can get back into some degree of their normal life. And from a medical standpoint for our patients who have chronic issues that still need to be treated, how do we manage some of those treatment decisions, whether it’s medications, procedures, other types of treatments- How do we manage that in a low-risk smart way for not only that individual but for society as a whole.

So those are some of the challenges, here’s some good things, I think. We’re still able to connect with patients. I think the telemedicine route as a tactic has been working really well. I think people are taking to it. I think people appreciate the ability to communicate directly with their physician and get some guidance and trusted opinions. I’ve had some pretty good conversations not only with my existing patients who already know and trust me, but also newer patients that need guidance for some of their issues that have been developing or have been chronic. And I think that is fantastic because we can take the technology that’s available and we can still help people out in ways that are ethical, professional, and still beneficial and value-driven.

Lastly, I think resilience and strength and joy and happiness and gratitude are still important at this time. It is April 15th, and we had 2 inches of snow this morning in Chicago. And for those that don’t know this that can happen in this sort of climate. And in the morning my daughter and I had the chance to go outside and try to enjoy the snow. And what’s interesting is there wasn’t a lot of snow. We can small snowman. There wasn’t a lot of snow so that we couldn’t actually go sledding, but we were able to have a little bit of a snowball flight. That’s a way to try to enjoy what we do have. Certain things are not going to be ideal, but we can still find joy and happiness in life. And I think it’s important to still try to find those kind of opportunities because that’s what makes living worthwhile and that’s what makes struggle worthwhile. You can still find happiness. So be strong, be resilient. I hope everyone is doing well. Have a good day and live well, bye bye.

***For more educational content:
Sign up for our email newsletter:

Subscribe to our Newsletter

See our blog:

Chicago Arthritis Blog

Listen to the Regenerative Medicine Report podcast:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenerative-medicine-report/

***For evaluation and treatment at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine:
Determine if you are a Regenerative Medicine treatment candidate:

Candidate Form

Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/contact-us/

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: All content in this message/video/audio broadcast and description including: infor­ma­tion, opinions, con­tent, ref­er­ences and links is for infor­ma­tional pur­poses only. The Author does not pro­vide any med­ical advice on the Site. Access­ing, viewing, read­ing or oth­er­wise using this content does NOT cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and it’s author. Pro­vid­ing per­sonal or med­ical infor­ma­tion to the Principal author does not cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and the Principal author or authors. Noth­ing con­tained in this video or it’s description is intended to estab­lish a physician-patient rela­tion­ship, to replace the ser­vices of a trained physi­cian or health care pro­fes­sional, or oth­er­wise to be a sub­sti­tute for pro­fes­sional med­ical advice, diag­no­sis, or treatment. You should con­sult a licensed physi­cian or appropriately-credentialed health care worker in your com­munity in all mat­ters relat­ing to your health.

***About this video***
In this video Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine discusses Covid19, testing issues, telemedicine, and good news.

Corona- Managing Pain while Social Distancing

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People are delaying evaluation and treatments for many conditions given the Covid19 conditions. So what can you do right now to help manage your pain while you are appropriately social distancing?
***For more educational content:
Sign up for our email newsletter:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/newsletter/
See our blog:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/blog/
Listen to the Regenerative Medicine Report podcast:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenerative-medicine-report/

***For evaluation and treatment at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine:
Determine if you are a Regenerative Medicine treatment candidate:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenexx-candidate-form/
Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/contact-us/

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: All content in this message/video/audio broadcast and description including: infor­ma­tion, opinions, con­tent, ref­er­ences and links is for infor­ma­tional pur­poses only. The Author does not pro­vide any med­ical advice on the Site. Access­ing, viewing, read­ing or oth­er­wise using this content does NOT cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and it’s author. Pro­vid­ing per­sonal or med­ical infor­ma­tion to the Principal author does not cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and the Principal author or authors. Noth­ing con­tained in this video or it’s description is intended to estab­lish a physician-patient rela­tion­ship, to replace the ser­vices of a trained physi­cian or health care pro­fes­sional, or oth­er­wise to be a sub­sti­tute for pro­fes­sional med­ical advice, diag­no­sis, or treatment. You should con­sult a licensed physi­cian or appropriately-credentialed health care worker in your com­munity in all mat­ters relat­ing to your health.
***About this video***
In this video Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine discusses how you can manage pain from arthritis, tendinitis, injuries, and back pain during Covid19 social distancing.