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Weekly Live- 20200610

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Weekly Live- 20200610
-Getting back to normal vs creating a higher standard.
-Covid19 updates.
-Risk awareness.
-Things worth living for.


-Hello everyone, this is Siddharth Tambar from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine. Welcome to our weekly live event. It’s Wednesday, June 10th. I hope everyone is doing well. Last few months have been something, really pretty intense. Here in Chicago, we entered phase three of our COVID recovery, which generally means that people are starting to be able to do more, some more regular activities. Restaurants are allowed to have patrons eat at the restaurant if they’re sitting outdoors and appropriately spaced. And people are progressively starting to go back to work and we’re seeing a lot more people outside and doing activities.

We’re starting to go back to some version of normal life. And it makes me think of a couple of things; you know, what is normal? Should we be better than normal? Where do we go from here? I’ve heard a lot of people say that we’re moving into a new normal, or we have to think about what is a new normal. It was suggested to me that instead of new normal, why don’t we think of a elevated or higher standard of where we want to be?

So I think COVID-19 has made us all think very differently about; the things that we value, how we’re living, a lot of things. And the recent social protest connected with the George Floyd murder, I think make us think about maybe normal isn’t good enough. Maybe our goal should not be to get back to just regular life, Maybe this is a moment where we start asking, how do we elevate and actually live better in terms of our expectations from our interactions with other people in, terms of what we want out of life? And maybe normal is not good enough. Maybe an elevated standard and a new normal is what we should be aiming for.

I know here at work, we’ve been thinking about that. And for the last year, we’ve made a big commitment in terms of communicating better with patients. And I think the last three months, we’ve taken that even higher to the point where we’re committing more resources, even bringing on an additional employee to help out with client service related issues. Because normal was not good enough, because I think our patients deserve a higher standard and hopefully we can deliver upon that higher standard.

So one of the things that I think is interesting, how do we balance risk and benefit? How do we think about getting back into some of the usual things that we do in life, but take into consideration what are the risks that we have to deal with in this kind of newer COVID world? And you know, what things are worth the risk, what things are not worth the risk?

A couple of examples. During the social protests, these last week and a half, there were a lot of people out and people had concern about; is there risk that you’re going to suddenly spread COVID-19 to a lot of people? And that’s interesting because in large groups of people, where you have less social distancing, that potential risk is there, but are there certain risks that are worthwhile taking?

Now, I wouldn’t be thrilled if a 85 year old individual that has multiple medical problems, was out there without mask. But the flip side is; if you’re a young person, a middle aged person, you’re still healthy, you’re wearing a mask, you’re being sensible, you’re protesting non-violently. Maybe that risk is worth it because the benefit is you’re trying to create a better society. It’s an example of where I think thinking about risk and benefit is not a static thing, it’s a much more dynamic thing.

On that same level, the World Health Organization this past week or last couple of days, came out saying that they’re not exactly sure about the risk of asymptomatic spreaders of COVID-19. That’s a little bit disappointing. It’s good news that if the risk is not as bad of asymptomatic spreaders, but the flip side is; we literally just stopped the whole world because of concern about asymptomatic spreaders. I think this is one of those things that’s still up in the air and we still don’t fully understand. And so, I think still maintaining the usual precautions is important, but I think it emphasizes that if you’re in a position of authority, like the World Health Organization, that you need to be careful with your words and how you’re guiding people. Because, if you say one thing one week, and then you say another thing a couple of weeks or couple of months later, that’s a little bit of a problem. Like, we literally stopped all of the world’s economic activity almost to account for asymptomatic spreaders.

But the flip side is; I think for those folks who are considered low risk, getting back into some version of their usual life, maybe they can slowly start creeping back into that. Which is what people are doing and I think that’s smart. I still think it would be sensible that if you do have any medical issues, that you still talk to your trusted physician to get guidance in that regard, that what are your own personal risks? What are things that are worthwhile getting into? And kind of balancing that,
An example of that is; I was speaking with a patient of mine, an 85 year old woman. She’s 85, she’s got things like diabetes, blood pressure but she’s relatively healthy. She’s got a lot of osteoarthritic issues that I help care for. In her words; she hasn’t been this stressed as COVID-19 has put her under stress. And the last time she was under this amount of stress was when she was a little kid living in Northern Italy during World War II bombings. That’s pretty profound to hear somebody say that and it’s affected her life in a lot of ways. For example, it’s because she’s had less social interaction with friends and family, because she’s had less physical activity that she would normally do with those social outings her back has started to ache. She’s a little bit less strong, a little bit weaker and that’s causing her back to be a problem. We’ve been able to maintain her back issue for the last three, four years with some treatment but really just a lot of physical activity. And trying to figure that out for her and realizing that that is a significant issue for her because it’s not only that she has back pain but in turn, that means that it’s hard for her to cook, it’s hard for her to do other things that she enjoys, gardening. And so, trying to figure out a sensible solution for her that’s still is cautious and risk conscious, has taken some effort. And a lot of it has been some small things, things like, well, what about if we try to get you some regular physical activity every hour or two? What if you work with a physical trainer remotely? Little things to try to get her back into that.
But the reality is that this is one of those costs of COVID-19 that I think, that really won’t register in terms of problems officially but it’s one of those things that is really meaningful because it affects her life, it affects her children’s life, it affects her quality of life, it also affects her husband as well. And so, it’s a big deal. So the other thing there is, she’s thinking about; what are the other things that she can get back into? I think it’s her and her husband’s like 60th wedding anniversary, something remarkable like that. And so, they’ve made some plans with their family where they’re going to cautiously try to have some kind of get together in that regard. Where they’re still maintaining some safety measures, social distancing and all that, but realizing that maybe the risk of that is low enough but the benefit is so high that she should absolutely do something like that. And so, I think the next several months are really going to be a lot of balancing benefit and risk and trying to figure that out.

I think one of the other challenges that a lot of us are going to have is how do we get back into our normal physical activity routine? I know the last few months I’ve had to change a lot of things, in terms of maintaining my shoulder health, my back health. Things that I was normally doing, I’ve had to sort of adopt other ideas with home related exercise rather than going to the gym. And I think it’s going to be interesting that as some of these facilities reopen, how do we get back into that? And I think, again, it’s a matter of being smart and targeted and risk aware that likely I’ll probably go back to playing tennis once where I play tennis opens up, because you’ve maintained kind of a natural amount of distance. I’d probably be a little bit more cautious upfront for those first few weeks or even month when they reopen the actual sort of gym facilities. But I think it’s one of those on a case-by-case basis where you recognize the benefit of doing certain activities and you have to balance that with other things.

I know in that same respect, one thing that we’re trying to do at work we’ve had, I mean, my office team has been incredibly busy and really hustling to try to make sure that patients and client service has been maintained the last few months, even when we’ve had COVID-19 going on. And so, we’re trying to set up some sort of outing where we can kind of meet outside of work in a safe space that sort of is able to let the rest of the team kind of cool off, enjoy themselves and sort of recognize some of their hard work. And I think, it’s a low-risk activity that we’ll figure out how to do but the benefit is; it’s a matter of connecting with the people who are working so hard and doing the right thing, that there’s some benefit to that.
I think there’s a version of that, that we have for everyone. Some sort of regular recommendations I would have for folks who are older, that are dealing with some of the challenges of being confined in social distancing is; keep in mind that there are certain things that are still worthwhile doing. You can still take a walk outside. I think when it comes to important life events, birthdays, do we totally avoid them now? I don’t necessarily think so, I think you can do some of these things in a risk-conscious, low-risk way. I think if you’re asymptomatic and you know that the number of people that are going to be at the event is going to be relatively small and limited, you can still partake in some of those activities.

Part of getting out of COVID-19 is recognizing what things are still important and are worth living for. And I think if we take nothing else from the last three and a half months, it’s resetting what is worthwhile for life. I think in the normal groove of life, there’s a lot of just distractions and things that don’t really have a lot of importance that we all get stuck in. And I’d like to think that in this new normal, this elevated standard, that hopefully we start to think about that. Maybe we really allocate our time and efforts on things that are more meaningful to us, because realizing that some things are still worth the risk and there’s a lot of things that really aren’t.

Lastly, the last recommendation for some of my autoimmune patients who are taking medications, good news is; we’re still on track. Meaning that if you’re on meds, understand that the evidence and data out there is that it’s still okay to stay on those medications. I still think you utilize the same precautions that we’ve all been taking in terms of social distancing, as well as wearing masks but understand that there’s no evidence that folks who are on these medications are at higher risk for complications. And as long as you’re asymptomatic and you’re doing well, you’re staying in touch with your physician, you’re making risk-conscious decisions, it’s okay.

I think this, it’s such an interesting time right now that we’re all so risk-conscious and thinking about things in ways that are different. Whether it’s, how do we want to live in a more equitable and just society? Or whether we’re thinking about what things are really worth the risk of living? I think we can come to some decisions individually and hopefully as a society to make smarter, better decisions that make life worthwhile living and make it better. So that we’re not just getting back to the usual normal but that we’re actually trying to live and get to a higher standard.

I appreciate your time. I hope everyone is doing well. Leave me your thoughts, and until next week, have a good day and live well! Thank you, bye-bye.


***For more educational content:
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See our blog:

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Listen to the Regenerative Medicine Report podcast:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenerative-medicine-report/

***For evaluation and treatment at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine:
Determine if you are a Regenerative Medicine treatment candidate:

Candidate Form

Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/contact-us/

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: All content in this message/video/audio broadcast and description including: infor­ma­tion, opinions, con­tent, ref­er­ences and links is for infor­ma­tional pur­poses only. The Author does not pro­vide any med­ical advice on the Site. Access­ing, viewing, read­ing or oth­er­wise using this content does NOT cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and it’s author. Pro­vid­ing per­sonal or med­ical infor­ma­tion to the Principal author does not cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and the Principal author or authors. Noth­ing con­tained in this video or it’s description is intended to estab­lish a physician-patient rela­tion­ship, to replace the ser­vices of a trained physi­cian or health care pro­fes­sional, or oth­er­wise to be a sub­sti­tute for pro­fes­sional med­ical advice, diag­no­sis, or treatment. You should con­sult a licensed physi­cian or appropriately-credentialed health care worker in your com­munity in all mat­ters relat­ing to your health.

***About this video***
In this video Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine discusses doing better than normal.

 

Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine update 20200415



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Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine update 20200415

Update on the happenings from Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine.
-Covid19/Corona Virus updates
-Testing challenges
-Good news!

Hello, this is Siddharth Tambar from Chicago arthritis and regenerative medicine. In this video this is meant to give you an update as to what’s going on here at Chicago arthritis and regenerative medicine on April 15th, 2020. In the middle of the covid-19 outbreak. There are some interesting challenges and also some positive things. I’ll start with the challenges and then get to the positive things.

So interestingly, I do have several patients that it’s come to my attention have turned out to be covid-19 positive. These are patients where we’ve done telemed evaluations because they have some chronic issues that were assisting with in either their autoimmune spectrum or chronic musculoskeletal issues. And it’s interesting. There is variety in terms of who is who has been affected but in general these are people that are typically a little bit higher risk either based on age or other medical issues. And what’s interesting is thankfully all these people have they seem to have done well, meaning they’ve recovered. Only one person was actually hospitalized and required formal medical treatment and has done well. In all cases they’re now all sort of quarantined, their families quarantined, and they seem to be recovering.

We’ve a couple of cases where people have really good stories from the last maybe six to eight weeks that sounds like based on their travel history that maybe at one point in the last month, maybe they were infected with covid-19. Hard to prove that this point of course, but some suspicion that these people could have had that. Another really challenging thing that I’m hearing is still about the testing. I think that’s improved but I’ve heard cases where people who very clearly were at some risk, not necessarily high high risk people based on age or other comorbidities. But as an example someone who works at a hospital and had fevers, cough, dry cough, as well as had lost his sense of smell, some classic things that have been described about covid-19. And he tried to get checked out at the hospital that he works at and they really wouldn’t test him. And he ended up actually getting testing on his own and tested positive. Paying out of pocket for that and tested positive. And thankfully he did that because he’s now self-quarantined, his whole family is self-quarantined. They’re doing all the right things. These are good citizens and good people of our society that have done that but they’ve had to find solutions that had to go above and beyond what our system could even help them out with which is which is disappointing at like that bigger picture level, but at that local micro-level to know that people still take that that seriously not only their own health, but their responsibility to others was heartening to me. And I’ve seen that in a couple of cases and so I’m actually happy to see that.

It brings me to the to another challenge, which is we’re getting to the point where either to some degree society is trying to get back to business as usual in two weeks, toward early May or that may get pushed off until mid-may. I think for those of us that can think about this rationally and sensibly life going back to normal is still going to be delayed for some time. We’ll have some version of normal, but it’s not going to be full on what we were two to three months ago. I think we have to be honest with that. And one idea is can we start to check some degree of antibody testing to determine who’s been exposed previously to covid-19, who has more of an acute exposure, and who hasn’t been exposed so that we can start to risk stratify people when it comes back to going to work. Take into consideration not only some of their other medical comorbidities, medications that they’re on, but their actual exposure history to covid-19. Because as time goes on we may realize that a lot more people have been exposed and are now possibly immune or lower risk- maybe is the way to think about it. Some of the challenges that I’m hearing and and I am someone and our clinic and our outfit is trying to actually get antibody testing kits, but some of the things that we’re hearing some of the challenges include what is the validity of some of these kits when it comes to testing. And how have they been tested and how they been verified. And the challenge is that in an attempt to get more kits out there, some of these may have very limited testing, some of these may have been tested in a very small number of patients. Some of these may have been tested not over months, maybe not even over weeks, maybe over days and so that that is that’s a little bit of a challenge. And as a individual physician the way that I try to think about this is if the evidence is muddy and the situation is little bit hazy, first and foremost is there good evidence that we can rely on. And are there low-risk, efficacious options for my patients to help us make good smart decisions. And sometimes there’s a little bit of conflict in those two things, meaning is there great evidence and what is a smart low-risk good option. And it can be a challenge but trying to make some good smart medical decisions is always the right way to go and I don’t know if we have the full answers right now in terms of what antibody tests are best and most appropriate to use but my hope is that over the next couple weeks we start getting more clarity on that so that we can start making smart decisions as to how people can get back into some degree of their normal life. And from a medical standpoint for our patients who have chronic issues that still need to be treated, how do we manage some of those treatment decisions, whether it’s medications, procedures, other types of treatments- How do we manage that in a low-risk smart way for not only that individual but for society as a whole.

So those are some of the challenges, here’s some good things, I think. We’re still able to connect with patients. I think the telemedicine route as a tactic has been working really well. I think people are taking to it. I think people appreciate the ability to communicate directly with their physician and get some guidance and trusted opinions. I’ve had some pretty good conversations not only with my existing patients who already know and trust me, but also newer patients that need guidance for some of their issues that have been developing or have been chronic. And I think that is fantastic because we can take the technology that’s available and we can still help people out in ways that are ethical, professional, and still beneficial and value-driven.

Lastly, I think resilience and strength and joy and happiness and gratitude are still important at this time. It is April 15th, and we had 2 inches of snow this morning in Chicago. And for those that don’t know this that can happen in this sort of climate. And in the morning my daughter and I had the chance to go outside and try to enjoy the snow. And what’s interesting is there wasn’t a lot of snow. We can small snowman. There wasn’t a lot of snow so that we couldn’t actually go sledding, but we were able to have a little bit of a snowball flight. That’s a way to try to enjoy what we do have. Certain things are not going to be ideal, but we can still find joy and happiness in life. And I think it’s important to still try to find those kind of opportunities because that’s what makes living worthwhile and that’s what makes struggle worthwhile. You can still find happiness. So be strong, be resilient. I hope everyone is doing well. Have a good day and live well, bye bye.

***For more educational content:
Sign up for our email newsletter:

Subscribe to our Newsletter

See our blog:

Chicago Arthritis Blog

Listen to the Regenerative Medicine Report podcast:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenerative-medicine-report/

***For evaluation and treatment at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine:
Determine if you are a Regenerative Medicine treatment candidate:

Candidate Form

Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/contact-us/

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: All content in this message/video/audio broadcast and description including: infor­ma­tion, opinions, con­tent, ref­er­ences and links is for infor­ma­tional pur­poses only. The Author does not pro­vide any med­ical advice on the Site. Access­ing, viewing, read­ing or oth­er­wise using this content does NOT cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and it’s author. Pro­vid­ing per­sonal or med­ical infor­ma­tion to the Principal author does not cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and the Principal author or authors. Noth­ing con­tained in this video or it’s description is intended to estab­lish a physician-patient rela­tion­ship, to replace the ser­vices of a trained physi­cian or health care pro­fes­sional, or oth­er­wise to be a sub­sti­tute for pro­fes­sional med­ical advice, diag­no­sis, or treatment. You should con­sult a licensed physi­cian or appropriately-credentialed health care worker in your com­munity in all mat­ters relat­ing to your health.

***About this video***
In this video Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine discusses Covid19, testing issues, telemedicine, and good news.

Corona- Managing Pain while Social Distancing

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People are delaying evaluation and treatments for many conditions given the Covid19 conditions. So what can you do right now to help manage your pain while you are appropriately social distancing?
***For more educational content:
Sign up for our email newsletter:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/newsletter/
See our blog:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/blog/
Listen to the Regenerative Medicine Report podcast:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenerative-medicine-report/

***For evaluation and treatment at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine:
Determine if you are a Regenerative Medicine treatment candidate:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenexx-candidate-form/
Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/contact-us/

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: All content in this message/video/audio broadcast and description including: infor­ma­tion, opinions, con­tent, ref­er­ences and links is for infor­ma­tional pur­poses only. The Author does not pro­vide any med­ical advice on the Site. Access­ing, viewing, read­ing or oth­er­wise using this content does NOT cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and it’s author. Pro­vid­ing per­sonal or med­ical infor­ma­tion to the Principal author does not cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and the Principal author or authors. Noth­ing con­tained in this video or it’s description is intended to estab­lish a physician-patient rela­tion­ship, to replace the ser­vices of a trained physi­cian or health care pro­fes­sional, or oth­er­wise to be a sub­sti­tute for pro­fes­sional med­ical advice, diag­no­sis, or treatment. You should con­sult a licensed physi­cian or appropriately-credentialed health care worker in your com­munity in all mat­ters relat­ing to your health.
***About this video***
In this video Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine discusses how you can manage pain from arthritis, tendinitis, injuries, and back pain during Covid19 social distancing.

Gratitude while Social Distancing 2020-04-06

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The environment is getting more stressful with news of rising Covid19 cases and deaths. It’s still essential to find gratitude in our day to day lives. There’s a lot that I am grateful for today including my health, my family, frontline colleagues saving humanity, patients who trust me with their health, my team at work for their dedication, and of course Monday afternoon walks with my daughter.

***For more educational content:
Sign up for our email newsletter: https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/newsletter/
See our blog: https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/blog/
Listen to the Regenerative Medicine Report podcast: https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenerative-medicine-report/


For evaluation and treatment at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine:Determine if you are a Regenerative Medicine treatment candidate: https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenexx-candidate-form/
Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment: https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/contact-us/


MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: All content in this message/video/audio broadcast and description including: infor­ma­tion, opinions, con­tent, ref­er­ences and links is for infor­ma­tional pur­poses only. The Author does not pro­vide any med­ical advice on the Site. Access­ing, viewing, read­ing or oth­er­wise using this content does NOT cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and it’s author. Pro­vid­ing per­sonal or med­ical infor­ma­tion to the Principal author does not cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and the Principal author or authors. Noth­ing con­tained in this video or it’s description is intended to estab­lish a physician-patient rela­tion­ship, to replace the ser­vices of a trained physi­cian or health care pro­fes­sional, or oth­er­wise to be a sub­sti­tute for pro­fes­sional med­ical advice, diag­no­sis, or treatment. You should con­sult a licensed physi­cian or appropriately-credentialed health care worker in your com­munity in all mat­ters relat­ing to your health.

***About this video***In this video Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine discusses gratitude.

Corona Update- Interview with MyHealthTeams- 20200327

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Autoimmune patients have lots of questions regarding the Corona/Covid19 virus outbreak and medications. This is a interview with MyHealthTeams where Siddharth Tambar MD discusses the various issues involved.

***For more educational content:
Sign up for our email newsletter:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/newsletter/
See our blog:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/blog/
Listen to the Regenerative Medicine Report podcast:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenerative-medicine-report/

***For evaluation and treatment at Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine:
Determine if you are a Regenerative Medicine treatment candidate:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/regenexx-candidate-form/
Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment:
https://www.chicagoarthritis.com/contact-us/

MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER: All content in this message/video/audio broadcast and description including: infor­ma­tion, opinions, con­tent, ref­er­ences and links is for infor­ma­tional pur­poses only. The Author does not pro­vide any med­ical advice on the Site. Access­ing, viewing, read­ing or oth­er­wise using this content does NOT cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and it’s author. Pro­vid­ing per­sonal or med­ical infor­ma­tion to the Principal author does not cre­ate a physician-patient rela­tion­ship between you and the Principal author or authors. Noth­ing con­tained in this video or it’s description is intended to estab­lish a physician-patient rela­tion­ship, to replace the ser­vices of a trained physi­cian or health care pro­fes­sional, or oth­er­wise to be a sub­sti­tute for pro­fes­sional med­ical advice, diag­no­sis, or treatment. You should con­sult a licensed physi­cian or appropriately-credentialed health care worker in your com­munity in all mat­ters relat­ing to your health.
***About this video***
In this video Siddharth Tambar MD from Chicago Arthritis and Regenerative Medicine discusses Corona virus, Covid19, autoimmune conditions and medication issues currently.